RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Learn about rights, equality, and more with
Dr. Stokes' peer-reviewed research and
teaching publications.

 

How an Entity Becomes a State:
Tibet, Taiwan, Palestine, and the Quest for Recognition

The question, "Why are some entities politically recognized as states while others are not?" is central to the conflicts faced by the peoples of Tibet, Taiwan, and Palestine, and indeed the entire world. It is a question whose answer defines the contours of the international arena and helps to decide the rights, obligations, and fates of people everywhere. Despite the plethora of research on the state, however, little is known about how the political recognition of states may operate as part of a larger international recognition structure. Such unknowns raise questions about the outcomes faced by entities like Tibet, Taiwan, and Palestine. Why, for example, have Tibet, Taiwan, and Palestine achieved the varying levels of political recognition that they have? How and why did opportunities to politically recognize Tibet (1913), Taiwan (1971), and Palestine (1948, 1988, and 2012) as states emerge when they did? And is there any validity to claims that there have been "missed opportunities" for Tibet, Taiwan, and Palestine to have been politically recognized as states?


In his dissertation research study, "How an Entity Becomes a State: Tibet, Taiwan, Palestine, and the Quest for Recognition," Dr. Stokes addresses these questions using original comparative-historical data to conceptualize the "opportunity structure for recognition" as an overarching framework by which to synthesize the theory and practice of recognizing states and would-be states. In this way, recognition or non-recognition are more than the outcome of the complex interactions between states, would-be states, the international system, and the sometimes-competing, sometimes-aligning interests and goals of each. Dr. Stokes argues that "opportunities for recognition" tend to emerge during times when political opportunities and state interests are in strong alignment, favoring an entity's political recognition as a state. The patronage of strong states can be a critical factor in the emergence and success of opportunities for recognition, but such patronage is not strictly necessary or sufficient to generate opportunities for recognition or for those opportunities to result in widespread recognition. Additionally, the study finds that claims about missed opportunities for recognizing Tibet, Taiwan, and Palestine are without merit.

Read Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition

 


Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition

Native American civil rights and social justice are often limited by tribal recognition. Learn more about how tribal recognition shapes and constrains Native American mobilization and collective action with DaShanne's article, "Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition: Theorizing the Effects of Political Acknowledgement," appearing in the American Indian Culture and Research Journal (pdf).

Read Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition

 


Writing Empirical Research Papers

Writing is a common activity in academia for students and professionals alike. Here are a number of the considerations that many journal reviewers and professors have in mind when reviewing empirical manuscripts. This checklist is by no means comprehensive and is directed at helping to shape student writing activities so as to generate quality empirical research papers.

Read Writing Empirical Research Papers

 


Creating and Challenging the Status Quo

Rules that sustain many forms of domination are typically created and imposed by the state. Laws can be used to stabilize power, especially by means of the state's bureaucratic apparatus and by means of its coercive resources for monitoring and enforcing compliance. But domination and effects of rules are never total--people have agency and can resist. In this activity the class will be challenged to find ways to both support and resist a law of the class's choosing.

Read Creating and Challenging the Status Quo

 


State Formation and the Challenges of Creating a New Country

Creating a new country along with a state apparatus to run it is tricky business. But what if you were challenged to create a new country yourself? How would you do it? In this activity students are challenged to draw upon course material on state formation and the emergence of new nations and states to symbolically create new countries and states themselves, gaining greater understanding of course materials and their real world applications in the process.

State Formation and the Challenges of Creating a New Country

 


Preparing for Applied and Conceptual Exams

This hand-out guides student activities as they go about the business of preparing for applied and conceptual multiple choice exams. It also serves as an excellent study guide for students well beyond coursework in political sociology.

Preparing for Applied and Conceptual Exams

 


Political Sociology Syllabus

Political Sociology is centrally concerned with political relations, policies, and practices as well as larger questions of conflict, cooperation, power, influence, and authority. Drawing on innovative methods of instruction, class discussions, and group activities, this course aims to provide a fun and intellectually stimulating environment in which to survey the dynamic field of political sociology, including: the nature and roles of power, influence, and authority; citizenship, nationalism, the state and nation; the sociology of law; class, the power elite, and political economy; transnational processes, imperialism, and hegemony; social movements and social change; gender; race, culture, and identity politics; and a wide array of other topics that impact our world today. (pdf)

Political Sociology Syllabus

 


 

PRESENTATIONS AT SCHOLARLY CONFERENCES

"Political Opportunities and the Quest for Recognition."
August 11, 2018. Paper presented at the 68th annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, Philadelphia, PA.


"The Role of Political Recognition in Native American Political Mobilization."
August 20, 2011 (w/ Sam Potter). Paper presented at the 61st annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, Las Vegas, NV.


"Law, Identity, and Power of Recognition: Domination and Resistance in Native American Federal Acknowledgement." August 17, 2010. Paper presented at the 105th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, Atlanta, GA.


"Native American Mobilization and the Power of Recognition."
August 13, 2010. Paper presented at the 60th annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, Atlanta, GA.


"The Myth of Religious Freedom: Native Americans, Identity Politics and the Eagle Feather Law."
August 10, 2009. Paper presented at the 104th annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, San Francisco, CA.


"Race, Identity Politics, and a Native American Social Movement That Could Have Been."
August 7, 2009. Paper presented at the 59th annual meeting of the Society for the Study of Social Problems, August 7, San Francisco, CA.


"In the Land of the Free: Suppressing an Indigenous Social Movement Through Identity Politics."
March 31, 2009. Paper presented at the Workshop Series on Power, Resistance, and Social Change. University of Pittsburgh, Department of Sociology, Pittsburgh, PA.


"The Peace Corps and the American Empire."
August 11, 2007. Presented at the 102nd annual meeting of the American Sociological Association, New York, NY.


"Native American Perceptions of Sibling Abuse."
March 11, 2005 (w/ K. Westmiller). Presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Boston, MA.


"Implicit Theories of Wife Abuse."
April 15, 2004 (w/ K. Rapoza and T. Zaveri). Presented at the annual meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association, Washington, DC.


"Reinventing the Social Conservation Psyche."
April 19, 2002. Presented at Idea Fest, April 19, Vermillion, SD.


"Unity Through Diversity: Native American Students and the Seventh Generation."
Stokes, DaShanne et al. April 17, 1998. Presented at Idea Fest, Vermillion, SD.


 

 

CITATION AND USE

Educators should feel free to use and adapt these resources to their courses as they see fit so long as proper citation and attribution is given.


 

 

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