ADOPTION AND FOSTER CARE

We are too often divided, our rights trampled upon,
our justice denied. These articles explore how we
can be a voice for change.

 

ADOPTION AND FOSTER CARE

Adoption

Having accidentally discovered that he was adopted at the age of 20 while trying to win his religious freedom, Dr. DaShanne Stokes' experiences are as uncommon as they are unsettling. Drawing on his experience teaching university courses on civil rights and social justice, as well as his work featured in publications like The Huffington Post, The Advocate, and Adoption Today, Dr. Stokes offers a unique perspective on pressing issues facing the adoption and foster care community ranging from racism and LGBT equality to religious freedom and adoptee rights.


For journalist inquiries, or to inquire about booking Dr. Stokes for a television, radio, or other media program, please email media (at) dashannestokes (dot) com.


 

 

 

Media Appearances About Adoption and Foster Care

 

How Homophobia is Hurting Our Nation's Foster Children


Progressive Voices:
How Homophobia is Hurting Our Nation's Foster Children

November 10, 2015

Homophobia helps prevent 400,000 foster children in the U.S. from finding homes and costs our nation $22 billion each year, and yet many states continue to ban qualified same-sex couples from adopting. DaShanne joined Michelle Meow on Progressive Voices (The Michelle Meow Show) to discuss how he accidentally discovered that he was adopted, to address the hidden costs of homophobia, and its impact on children in foster care and the larger LGBT community.


Listen Now >>


 

 

Articles About Adoption and Foster Care

 

The Huffington Post

 

"I Didn't Know I Was Adopted" by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) Seventeen years ago this month, I was in the middle of a full-blown identity crisis. I didn't know who or what I was anymore, let alone what to call myself. As our nation turns to celebrate National Adoption Month, I'm reminded of accidentally discovering, at the age of twenty, that I was adopted... Continue reading in The Huffington Post>>


 

"We Need A National Adoption Month Unscripted" by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) Adoption is a lifelong experience and finding a "forever family" is only the first step to meeting the needs of adoptive children... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


 

"Ten Questions Answered About Late Discovery Adoption" by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) Accidentally discovering that I was adopted was earth shattering. I found myself in an identity crisis in which everything I thought I knew about myself, including my family, my ancestry and cultural identity... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


 

"How Racism is Hurting Our Nation's Foster Children" by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) Institutionalized racism remains alive and well in America. And it's hurting our nation's children.... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


 

"What Accidentally Discovering I Was Adopted Taught Me About Religious Freedom" by DaShanne Stokes**

(from The Huffington Post) In the summer of 1998, only a month after I turned 20, I accidentally discovered that I was adopted. The experience threw me into an identity crisis. It also had the curious effect of teaching me about religious freedom... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


**Featured on the Front Page of the Huffington Post. September 25, 2015.


 

"A Life in America Without Religious Freedom" by DaShanne Stokes**

(from The Huffington Post) They say that America is the land of the free. But as I hiked into the woods to find a place to hide my sacred eagle feathers out of fear of being arrested, I wondered how free we really are. ... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


**Featured on the Front Page of the Huffington Post. September 24, 2015.


 

"From Abused and Homeless to Ph.D." by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) "Oh, my God. Are you serious?" That's a reaction I often get when people hear how I accidentally discovered, at the age of twenty, that I was adopted... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


 

"Adoptee Rights Are Your Rights, Too" by DaShanne Stokes

(from The Huffington Post) Why deny adoptees their personal records and original birth certificates if it's against what most adoptees and their biological parents want? It makes no sense... Continue reading in The Huffington Post >>


 

The Advocate

 

"This Country Is Apparently Still Not Ready for Gay Parents" by DaShanne Stokes**

(from The Advocate) As someone who's lectured at the university level about this system, of which I am a product, I have to admit I've never understood why so many of my foster care brothers and sisters continue to languish in the foster care system. In truth, they should have found homes a long time ago. ... Continue reading >>


**Reprinted as "How Homophobia is Hurting Our Nation's Foster Children" in The Huffington Post.


 

Adoption Today

 

"Discovering 'Who' In A Land of 'What'" by DaShanne Stokes

(from Adoption Today) In the summer of 1998, just after I turned 20, I learned, by accident, that I was adopted. The experience redefined how I understood race, culture and ethnicity. It also came to teach me a great deal about the importance of valuing "who" we are when so many focus on "what" we are, or what others think we are... Continue reading >>


 

Quotes About Adoption and Foster Care

 

"What matters most is not 'what' you are, but 'who' you are."
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"Adoption isn't just a childhood experience, it's a life-long experience."
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"Blood can help make family, but family often transcends blood."
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"People think that LGBTs adopting children will hurt them, but it's not being in loving homes that hurts children most."
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"Discovering that I was adopted redefined my entire world, but it taught me that who you are doesn't change."
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